Two New Seminars Announced

16 Jan

memphis model workshop health faith
The Congregational Health Network: Adaptation Seminar
Immersion and Presentation

March 20-21, 2014

(the next is June 12-13th)

The Congregational Health Network is a partnership between Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, congregations and other relevant community entities in the Memphis metropolitan area designed to address health issues by increasing the congregation’s and the hospital’s ability to care for their members and the surrounding community.

Schedule for March Seminar

Meeting location: Methodist University Hospital, 1265 Union Ave. Memphis 38104
Meeting room: Center of Excellence in Faith & Health, Media Room

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

10:00 am – 12:00 noon; Welcome and Partner Introductions (Rev. Harry Durbin, Interim Sr. V.P.; Rev., Bobby Baker, Director of Faith & Community Partnerships: & Niels French, Director of Operations, Faith Health Division. Welcome to Methodist Healthcare’s Faith Health Division. Introduction to the Center of Excellence in Faith and Health. Introductions of participants and staff. Who are you, your agency and what do you hope to learn? The concept of the Center of Excellence. CHN as an asset-based community partnership. Why CHN works in Memphis – Mission – Ministry – Market Share

12:00 pm – 12:15 Break

12:15 – 1:00 pm Setting the stage for implementing and adapting your community health strategy, Community Benefit, and context
Ed Rafalski, Senior V.P. for Strategic Planning and Marketing, Methodist Healthcare

1:00 – 1:30 pm Lunch

1:30 – 2:30 pm More CHN History (Rev. Bobby Baker, Dir. of Faith & Community Partnerships). Initial Group formation; Covenant Committee; Congregation integration, Spiritual Care Component; Hospital Integration and Training. Science, Assets and Leadership: Science of CHN, Community Health Asset Mapping.

2:30 – 3:00 pm CHN and Community Health in 38109; (Joy Crawford, Community Navigator)

3:00 – 3:30 pm CHN Education Strategy (Rev. Dr. Perry Little, Chaplain Manager)

3:30 – 4:00 pm Sickle Cell and CHN working together, Mark Yancy, Program Administrator, Methodist Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center

4:00 End of session

6:30 pm Dinner (dinner at restaurant with discussions, and/or sight-seeing and Beale Street)

Friday, March 21

9:00 – 11:30 am Roles and Integration (Chaplain Manager Dan Wilborn, Navigator Jean Evans, Community liaison-Minnie Moore, Divine Faith; Community pastor—TBD

  • Roles: Navigators & Liaisons
  • Navigator Job Description
  • Choosing Liaison(s)
  • Liaison Training
  • Registering Congregations
  • Liaison Reporting
  • Specialty Navigators

11:30 am- 12:30 pm Lunch and Technology (Chip Clay, Project Manager)
CHN data collection, tracking and technology

12:30 – 1:00 pm Research, Grants and Foundation role, partners, grants and donors
Overview with healthcare consultant, Rick Thomas

1:00 – 2:00 pm Summary and Closing discussion

2:00 – 2:30 pm Visit, dialogue and tour of the Church Health Center Wellness Program, Sterling McNeil , 1115 Union Ave.

Recommended lodging: Hotel Inn Express Medical Center, 1180 Union Ave, Memphis, TN 38104. Tel. 901-276-1175; Fax 901-276-4261. (Ask for hospital rate)

Flights information: Airline tickets to and from Memphis are relatively expensive. Little Rock, Arkansas is a 2- hour drive from Memphis and often has cheaper fares.

Registration fee: The registration fee is $ 250/person and covers meals and materials. Make checks payable to Methodist Healthcare Foundation, c/o Niels French, 1211 Union Ave. Ste. 733, Memphis, TN 38104. The registration fee is based on ability to pay and can be waived if necessary.

For More Information: Contact Niels French: niels.french@mlh.org or call 901-516-0835.

NY Times features Memphis Breast Cancer Screening Program

23 Dec

nytimes memphis model“Tackling a Racial Gap in Breast Cancer Survival,” an article in The New York Times by Tara Parker-Pope, describes a gap in breast cancer survival and what one group in Memphis is doing about it. While survival rates have generally risen dramatically among U.S. women, the same is not true for African American women.

“Over all, black women with a breast cancer diagnosis will die three years sooner than their white counterparts. While nearly 70 percent of white women live at least five years after diagnosis, only 56 percent of black women do,” says the article. It cites a Sinai Institute study that found black women 40 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women.

times memphisWhen Dr. Ed Rafalski of Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare (MLH) learned that Memphis topped the list for this disparity, he invited some people to Memphis to explore solutions. The article explains that reasons for the gap include poverty, distrust of the health system from years of discrimination, and lack of insurance. As a result, says Parker-Pope, “Black women often arrive at the hospital with cancers so advanced, they rival the late-stage disease that doctors see among women in developing nation.”

After deliberations, the group decided to focus on getting women breast cancer screenings. The effort turned into a powerful partnership between MLH, the Congregational Health Network that includes more than 500 area congregations, the Avon and Komen foundations, Dr. Kurt Tauer of the West Cancer Clinic, and others.

Be sure to watch the moving video tells the story of Mary Singleton, 57, who participated in a free screening that found Stage 4 cancer.

See links to related articles.

Photo: Ruth Fremson, The New York Times.

Why Courage Matters

25 Nov

tom peterson storm drain cover

By Jonathan Lewis

Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point, which means, at the point of highest reality. A chastity or honesty or mercy which yields to danger will be chaste or honest or merciful only on conditions. Pilate was merciful till it became risky.” — C.S. Lewis in The Screwtape Letters

For me, this quote connects with the biblical command “Do not be afraid.” Courage might be described as fear’s opposite. While the biblical writers wanted us to “not be afraid,” the next  question might be “Why?” What’s so important about not being afraid? Or put another away, what’s so important about courage?

As you can see, C.S. Lewis has a thought about this. What he seems to be saying is that courage is the foundation of every other virtue. No good thing, no valuable quality, no aspect of anyone’s personality or heart or character will really, in the end, be worth much without courage. Because, as Lewis points out, every good and valuable thing in life will eventually be put to the test.

What good is a compassionate person if they can only show compassion in situations that are easy? Of what use is a wise person who can only express wisdom when it doesn’t contradict another person or won’t step on someone else’s toes? What value is there in a love that can only work, can only act, can only love when no risk is involved?

In the movie The Edge the character played by Anthony Hopkins says it this way: “We are all put to the test. But it never comes in the form or at the point we would prefer, does it?”

No, it almost never does. And that’s why, at some point, in some form, we will all need to be courageous if we hope to be strong, or to be loving, or  wise, or merciful—or to be anything else worth being. And that’s probably why biblical writers tell us no less than 366 times that simple and ever-important message: Do not be afraid.

And we shouldn’t be. We don’t have to be afraid. We never ever have to be afraid as long as God is with us, and He is with us as long as we ask Him to be, as long as we let Him be. With us, protecting us, helping us – this is where God wants to be, if we will let Him.

So let us be courageous: courageous that we might not be afraid, courageous that we might be everything else God wants us to be. Let us be courageous even when, especially when, it’s hard.

Jonathan Lewis is Staff Chaplain at Methodist South Hospital.

Quote of the Week: Michael Jordan

22 Nov

423px-Michael_JordanDon’t tell me the sky’s the limit when there are footprints on the moon.

Photo: Creative Commons

Workshop: Dec. 9-10, Congregational Health Network

16 Nov

congregational health networkThe Congregational Health Network: Adaptation Seminar–Immersion and Presentation

Join us!

The Congregational Health Network is a partnership between Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, congregations and other relevant health community entities in the Memphis metropolitan area designed to address health issues by increasing the congregation’s and the hospital’s ability to care for their members and the surrounding community.

The CHN is a living, working transformative model of care based on covenanted partnerships between Methodist  Healthcare and about 500 congregations. Known as the “Memphis Model,” the work of the CHN blends intelligence about how faith works best for community health and in health systems. “Blended intelligence” refers to the integration of community wisdom, hospital data streams, academic research and the best practice knowledge from local and international partners.

The 1½-day seminar includes sharing and discussion about all components of the Congregational Health Network including sessions with pastors, liaisons, navigators, project managers and the CHN director. Program materials will be liberally shared for participants to take back and adapt in their owncommunity health context.

Registration: The registration fee of $250 per person covers meals and materials. Make checks payable to Methodist Healthcare Foundation, c/o Niels French, 1211 Union Ave. Ste. 733, Memphis, TN 38104. The registration fee is based on ability to pay and can be waived if necessary.

For more information, contact Niels French: niels.french@mlh.org

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